Spinning Tuesdays: A Winner, Kid Mohair and Churro

Our winner of the spectacular spinning gift basket is : Rachael from Rochester.

Congratulations Rachael, happy spinning and learning about different fibers.

A big Thank You to Storey Publishing, Interweave and The Spinning Loft for supplying our prizes.

 

On to our spinning!

First this week I spun Kid Mohair

Kid Mohair: fleece, yarn and swatches

Wow this was fun to work with! Silky and sexy – it’s most of what makes up Rowan’s famous Kid Silk Haze after all.

I didn’t both to wash the fiber, it had a little vm, but no real dirt and it wasn’t sticky.

Kid Mohair yarn

I combed the fiber and made two samples, one thin and one thick spinning woolen-ish. Then just to be ornery I carded some (which some folk frown upon for long stapled fiber) and spun it long and fluffy draw. I was surprised at a couple of things: How shiny it is even when spun woolen. How fast it got away from me and got lumpy.

This is a fiber that piqued my curiosity and I want to spend more time learning to control it, learning how it loves to being spun.

Two fun facts about Kid Mohair from The Fleece and Fiber Sourcebook:

  1. Kid Mohair can be as fine in diameter as merino
  2. Mohair kids are first shorn when their fleece is 4 inches long

 

Next up is Churro

Churro kind of made my head explode

Churro: dirty and clean fleece and yarn and a knitted swatch

It is a unique and a little odd fiber. It has such a rich and important history I really wanted to like it, but looking at it it just confused me.

The fleece wasn’t dirty and it was only a little sticky. One wash and it was clean. It is a sort of double coated fiber, different looking but not different enough in coarseness to separate the fibers.

I watched the Churro portion of the Handspinning Rare Wools dvd, and prepped the fiber exactly like Deb suggested. I carded it.

Churro yarn

It only did two passes with my handcards and spun it longdraw. It made an even and lofty yarn, much softer than I expected. I wouldn’t wear it next t0 my skin, but I was surprised how soft it felt in comparison to Navajo rugs that are woven from Churro.

This fiber is strong. Prepped and spun woolen I couldn’t break even a single with my hands.

Two fun facts about Churro from The Fleece and Fiber Sourcebook:

  1. Churro are the oldest breed in North America
  2. Churro are a breed original to North America

The American Livestock Breeds Conservancy rates Churro as a Threatened breed.

 

Until next week, happy spinning!

 

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7 thoughts on “Spinning Tuesdays: A Winner, Kid Mohair and Churro

  1. Deborah Robson

    I won’t be one of the folks frowning at carding long fibers! Although at this phase in my spinning life I mostly comb (because we didn’t have combs when I started to spin), I’ll card long fibers to get special effects.

    On Navajo-Churro: the wool is surprising, and variable. The sample you have looks and sounds like a “typical” fleece, with double-coating that isn’t distinctive enough to encourage separating the coats. Also in that it spun up feeling softer than you expected. There *are* relatively single-coated and more strongly double-coated fleeces in the breed.

    Loving your experiments!

  2. Rachael

    I’m Rachael from Rochester, and I cannot thank you folks enough for having such an awesome giveaway! I can’t wait to get my hands on this stuff.

  3. Cindy Holben

    Talk about fibers with differing characteristics. Thanks for sharing this information.

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