Just a quick note from all of us at the KnittyBlog, wishing you a spectacular 2014!

To send off 2013 on a happy note we each rounded up three things that we loved or were proud of in 2013.

Jillian’s Top 3:

Rhinebeck classroom

Rhinebeck classroom

1. Teaching at Rhinebeck.

Rhinebeck has been on my list of  there’s-no-way goals for a couple of years now. For 2013 I applied and was accepted. I had a spectacular time teaching and learned as much if not more than I taught.

PLY Magazine

PLY Magazine

2. PLY Magazine

I feel honored to be part of the Editorial Board of PLY Magazine. It’s everything I was looking for in a new spinning magazine, lots to do and lots to think about. I knew Jacey Boggs would create an amazing magazine.  I am excited that so many other spinners feel the same way.

KB-dropcloth-embroidery-400x2643. Embroidery

I fell hard for embroidery this year. I has never learned in my childhood, so I figured 50 was a good time to learn. I do a little every day and am moving to adding it to my knitting. I love learning new things and it’s feel good to remember how to be a beginner.

 


 Amy’s Top 3:

dennyripple

Denny models my Neat Ripples blanket in progress, just hours before my car window gets bashed in so someone can steal it.

1. Learning to crochet
I was pushed over the edge into this new-to-me craft by a deep need to make a Neat Ripples blanket. Crocheting ripples is a comforting and aesthetically pleasing addition to my craft arsenal. I love it and I’m still doing it.

2. Yarndale (and meeting Lucy)
Lucy is the designer of said Neat Ripples blanket pattern, and I, along with hundreds and hundreds of others, were thrilled to meet her at the newest fiber festival in Yorkshire, UK, last September: Yarndale. I taught some classes and met a lot of great knitters. I rhapsodized about it here.

3. Getting my stolen blanket (etc) back
In what is one of the oddest things to ever happen to me, my unlabelled Cath Kidston knitting bag (itself not inexpensive) full of my Neat Ripples afghan in progress, all my crochet hooks AND all the cotton DK yarn I’d been saving for 10 years to make it was returned to me unharmed, three months after it was originally stolen. Someone dumped it after finding out it wasn’t worth selling to buy crack, another someone found it and one tiny receipt from my chiropractor left in the inside pocket helped that someone get it back to me.

Still can’t believe that happened.


Kate’s Top 3:

1. Bigger on the TV
Seeing my Bigger on the Inside shawl on TV! A knitter was spotted wearing the shawl on the Doctor Who 50th Anniversary special pre-show show in the US.

2. Recording and launching online classes which has introduced me to a whole new crowd of knitters, students and friends around the world. It was also great learning exercise for me, as a teacher, to think about how to present ideas so they are most impactful, to see how I look and sound on camera, and to be able to examine my own teaching style. Challenging, but totally worth it.

3. Having a colorway named after me… well, actually, one of my spelling mistakes.

Just perfect. And perfectly hilarious.

I am a tech editor, as you probably know. I’m usually pretty good at proofreading others’ work, but I find it immensely difficult to proofread my own work. A couple of years ago I designed a pattern for the indigodragonfly club. I tried to work extra hard to proofread my own pattern, but as is always the way, a typo crept in.

Now, this was a lace design, and I often use a safety pin in lacework to mark the RS of the work – I find it helpful when establishing the pattern.

But I often type faster than I think…. So instead of “safety pin” I typed “safety pint”.

That in itself is funny enough.

But with me being a relatively well-known tech editor with a passion for precision, and it being a design for the indigodragonfly club (where strange things have been known to happen), the typo stopped the TE in her tracks.

There was, apparently, some discussion about whether it was a mistake, or whether I’d actually intended it to be that way.

We’ve been laughing about this ever since. It’s become a sort of short-hand for “beware: this is the sort of pattern that might drive you to drink”.

And this spring, the genius yarn dyers Ron and Kim surprised me with a gift: a colorway named for my typo – “Safety Pin or Safety Pint: Discuss”, a most fantastic orange.

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5 Responses to 2013: We Had Fun!

  1. Alicia says:

    What a fun way to sum up the year! I can’t believe the crochet bag got returned, that is so wonderful.

  2. MmmYarn says:

    What a nice wrap-up to 2013.
    Jillian — congratulations on teaching! I’ve enjoyed your spinning posts throughout the year.
    Amy — that is a great lost and found story! Tell me no broken glass got mixed in.
    Kate — some projects just require a safety pint. :)

  3. cal says:

    among my highlights of the year were teaching (and hanging) with Amy here in NY and taking a class with Jillian at Rhinebeck! and Amy, i am BEYOND THRILLED to hear that the blanket bag made its way back to you! that is proof that the world is good! Kate, i didn’t see you this year BUT i have a box full of Tuffy yarn i ordered last year to make your thick warm socks and i’m starting those this week now that all the craft fairs and gifting are done. happy new year ladies of Knitty!

  4. Sandy says:

    Amy, loved the story about your bag. I read it to hubby and he said “good thing the crack doctor got involved, rather than the crack addict.” ;-)

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