Carding Top

From left: top, carded rolag and pulled roving.
From left: top, carded rolag and pulled roving.

Everyone that’s spun with me knows that my default draft is woolen. I love to watch that twist and air zip into the fiber. Most of the fiber I spin is top, natural and dyed. I don’t usually prep my own fiber and top is the go-to prep for commercially prepared fiber. There is commercial roving available but it’s not as easy to find as top.

Spinning top woolen gives me a yarn that is one of those semis. I hate using the phrases semi woolen or semi worsted. I like just being clear about what I’m doing – spinning top woolen. That makes a yarn that is loftier than spinning top worsted. I like it, it’s a good everyday yarn.

 

Left: top drafted woolen, right: top carded and pulled into roving and spun woolen.
Left: top drafted woolen, right: top carded and pulled into roving and spun woolen.

Lately I’ve been wanting more air in my fiber. I’ve become curious about making a light yarn with good stitch definition (more on that another day) so I’ve been carding top. It’s great fun, a couple of passes on my cards and I’ve misaligned those fibers into fluff,;it’s top no longer.

After I card I make a rolag and pull that into roving and spin. It makes such airy yarn!

Do you ever card top?

 

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Jillian is the​ author of the best-selling spinning book Yarnitecture. She is the editor​ of Knittyspin and Developmental Editor for PLY and PLY Books. She kinda loves this spinning thing and wants everyone who spins to love it too, so she teaches and writes a lot. She knits, weaves, and stitches and tries to do as much of it as she can with handspun yarn. She's always cooking up all kinds of exciting and creative things combining fiber arts. She likes her mysteries British, her walks woodsy, and to spend as much time as she can laughing. Spy on her on her website jillianmoreno.com

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