WWW: Mystery Twit-along starts TODAY!; Vintage Shetland book launch in London; whatup with those crazy vintage needle sizes anyway?

The Vintage Shetland Project by Susan Crawford

From Kathleen Sperling, aka @wipinsanity (and designer for Knitty), comes this new fun project: A Mystery Twit-Along. “I’ll tweet out a bit of the pattern instructions every two days, and you can follow along with your #knitting and see what takes shape. Sound good? It’ll start May 9…” That’s today!

Click here to see the pattern requirements and basic instructions. I wonder what it will be…


The Vintage Shetland Project by Susan Crawford

From Susan Crawford: if you’re in London (the UK one), you’re in luck! This Saturday, you can join Susan at the launch party for her new book: The Vintage Shetland Project

Susan is an acknowledged expert on vintage British knitwear, and this has been an 8-year project of love.

I can’t wait to see this book myself.


Vintage Beehive knitting needle gauge. Size 1 is the largest. That’s confusing.

I was talking with a friend about the origins of the needle gauge system, specifically talking about needles from the beginning of the last century, and she pointed me to this article. It’s written for Anesthetists, but I think the same principle may apply to craft needles of all kinds. It all goes back to the milling of the wire.

My google-fu isn’t coming up with anything that officially links the information in this article with knitting. Does anyone have more information that I can add here?

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3 thoughts on “WWW: Mystery Twit-along starts TODAY!; Vintage Shetland book launch in London; whatup with those crazy vintage needle sizes anyway?

  1. Pingback: Stumbling Over Chaos :: Linkity rejoices at the return of greenery to Minneapolis

  2. Catx

    Per wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knitting_needle#Needle_sizes_and_conversions

    “In the UK, knitting needle ‘numbers’ are the Standard Wire Gauge designation of the wire from which metal needles are made. The origin of the numbering system is uncertain but it is thought that needle numbers are based on the number of increasingly fine dies that the wire has to be drawn through. In the UK, then, thinner needles thus have a larger number.”

    The same might be true for old US steel dpns (which had different sizing from ‘standard’ needles, but look fairly similar to UK sizing).

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