www: saving an ancient craft, micro knitting, good moths

Zamarada Moth (Zamarada scintillans) knit by Max Alexander

 Porfirio Gutierrez weaving. Photo by Javier Lazo Gutierrez. From "Saving an Ancient Craft: Porfirio Gutierrez Returns Home" by Justin Mugits.Weaver Porfirio Gutierrez, has returned to Mexico to protect his Zapotec weaving heritage. You can learn more about Porfirio at his website, porfiriogutierrez.com

Pictured: Porfirio Gutierrez weaves a textile with a traditional Zapotec design using a nine-thread-count-per-inch comb loom. Photo by Javier Lazo Gutierrez.

“Saving an Ancient Craft: Porfirio Gutierrez Returns Home” by Justin Mugits. National Museum of the American Indian, Spring 2019 / Vol. 20, No. 1



Zamarada Moth (Zamarada scintillans) knit by Max AlexanderMany knitters fear moths, artist Max Alexander has embraced them, by knitting their likeness. This article from a few years ago resurfaced and is a great introduction to her amazing work.

Visit Max’s World at maxsworld.co.uk

Pictured is the Zamarada Moth (Zamarada scintillans).



Sheep Farm trio knit by Althea Cromeby I am a “tiny knitter” (in that I enjoy 2mm and smaller needles) but I have nothing on the work of Althea Crome who is a Micro Knitter! Wow.

Learn more about Althea at her website, altheacrome.com

Pictured is her Sheep Farm trio (2018).


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Penny Shima Glanz spends her days spinning yarn and code into memorable projects. Small businesses rely on her for smart technology decisions. She creates understated elegance in her hand-knit and crochet designs. She loves muddy trail runs, fosters kittens, and lives in Westchester, NY with her husband and cat.

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