WWW: women’s work exhibit, AI knitting, and woolen Tulalip traditions

progression of gloves knitted from a MIT CSAIL program

ditchling museum exhibit: women's work, shown are several garments from the exhibit on dress formsThe Ditchling Museum of Art + Craft (East Sussex, UK) has an exhibit on now through 13 October 2019, Women’s Work. It focuses on the work of craftswomen who turned their practice’s into successful businesses between the two World Wars.

Learn more at ditchlingmuseumartcraft.org.uk



progression of gloves knitted from a MIT CSAIL program Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Computer Science & Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (aka MIT CSAIL, Massachusetts, USA) have come up with a new approach to streamline the process: a new system and design tool for automating knitted garments, InverseKnit and CADKnit.

Knitty design submissions for Winter are due 15 Sept 2019.



Senior curator Tessa Campbell with a rare example of a blanket made from woolly dog hair and mountain goat hair at the Hibulb Cultural Center in Tulalip (Washington, USA). The blanket is part of the current exhibit "Interwoven History, Coast Salish Wool." (Andy Bronson / The Herald)Exhibit weaves together Tulalip tribes traditions with wool, the centerpiece of the display is a 200-year-old blanket made with wool from a now-extinct dog. [via Liz]

photo: Senior curator Tessa Campbell with a rare example of a blanket made from woolly dog hair and mountain goat hair at the Hibulb Cultural Center in Tulalip (Washington, USA). The blanket is part of the current exhibit “Interwoven History, Coast Salish Wool.” (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

(57 Posts)

Penny Shima Glanz spends her days spinning yarn and code into memorable projects. Small businesses rely on her for smart technology decisions. She creates understated elegance in her hand-knit and crochet designs. She loves muddy trail runs, fosters kittens, and lives in Westchester, NY with her husband and cat.

One thought on “WWW: women’s work exhibit, AI knitting, and woolen Tulalip traditions

  1. Pingback: Stumbling Over Chaos :: Linkity looks off into the distance

Comments are closed.