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WWW: The Knit Show is LIVE!; everyone can wear horizontal stripes; the conundrum of Innocent’s smoothie hats; sheep to help you sleep

We’re thrilled that our friend Vickie Howell’s The Knit Show project, funded by Kickstarter (go crowdfunding!) is finally live and we can watch it! After watching the first few episodes, I’m very happy to have been one of Vickie’s supporters, and can’t wait to see what other cool people and techniques she’ll be featuring in future shows. Yay Vickie! Yay crowdfunding!


Vertical stripes? No thank you.

Via one of my favorite Brits, Eleanor  of Knit Nottingham comes this link to a blog post from the past (via the retired blog Knitting at Large) that needs to be read: it makes my heart happy: Horizontal stripes do NOT make you look fatter. Thank heavens, because I am almost finished my After the Rain pullover, which has horizontal stripes and I love it.

I have always thought that vertical stripes look like a circus tent on people of any size.


I confess that I have been charmed by the tiny hats on smoothie bottles that knitters have donated when I’ve visited the UK in past years. But the Knitting Goddess blog post brings up some very good points about their effectiveness in making change for the elderly, and suggests better ways for knitters to support them without adding yarn to landfill. Cute can only go so far.


Want to see the dullest movie ever made? May we present Baa Baa Land. An 8-hour movie designed to help you fall asleep. Here’s a little snippet:

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WWW: Alan Cumming invents (cough cough) stitch + bitch; Canadian knitters knit socks for UK exhibition; Japanese inventor wants knitting technology to lighten your car

photo of Alan Cumming in front of the sign to his club

ctor Alan Cumming at his East Village venue in 2016. Photo © Sean Zanni

Okay, it’s quite amusing that the wonderful Mr Cumming thinks his friend invented the term “stitch + bitch”, but we’re not really complaining. Because he and his friend, Knitmaster Tom, are offering a Stitch + Bitch night at his new Club Cumming in the East Village of Manhattan. If I were close enough to get there, you bet I would.

If any of you do go, would you send us pictures?


A wonderful display of support shown by Canadian knitters for an exhibition commemorating World War I held in Fordingbridge in the UK. Approximately 30 pairs of handknit socks in the style of the period will be on display.

Take a look at the socks in the article. They’re interestingly tube-shaped, ribbed around the heel and ankle area, and then plain stockinette up the calf till they culminate in a ribbed cuff. Anyone ever knit socks like these?


I love a good tech-meets-knitting story. (Warning: autoplay video with audio) Mitsuhiro Shima has invented whole-garment knitting machines, and wants to adapt them to knitting — get this — car parts. Knitting car parts, then coating the finished items with resin, produces a lighter finished result than conventional methods.

You go, Shima-san.

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Obsession Thursday: Pawley Studios’ yummy MUGS

I am a fan of handmade things. That should not be a surprise, considering. You know?

I love glass. And I love pottery. I’ve seen Pawley Studios’ mugs around at shows, and I wanted some for Knitty.

And now we have them. To celebrate our 15th anniversary, Amanda Pawley has created this gorgeousness for us:

Just 3 of the gorgeous colors Pawley Studios offers

So who is this Amanda Pawley person? In her own words:

“I’ve been making pots for 14 years.  I took my first class in 2003, and I’ve been working in clay ever since.  After college I worked with another full time potter in Florida for two years, which is where I learned more of the business side of being an artist.  My husband and I have had our own studio in Kentucky for 10 years, and we both work at the studio full time.
My favorite part of the process is throwing pieces on the wheel.  It is very relaxing!   It is extremely easy to get caught up in the process and lose track of time, very similar to knitting and crocheting.  I love making functional ware, making beautiful pieces that also have a purpose.  I believe handmade crafts stimulate an emotional connection with the user. I am happiest when people enjoy using one of my pots.

All of my clay and glazes are food, dishwasher, microwave and oven safe.  I stream every day live from my studio.  I can teach others about the ceramic process, and streaming allows customers to watch their order being made in real time.”

Pawley Studios is a cat-friendly zone

 

Attaching a handle to a mug

 

Glazing a mug destined for the hands of our Facemelter Patrons (a special surprise for them!)

You can get your own Knitty 15th Anniversary mug (in your choice of any of the colors they offer) right on their site. They’ll ship anywhere. If you order, pop up a picture when you get it on Twitter or Instagram, would you? Use the hashtag #knittymag so we can see yours in action!

 

 

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WWW: Superhero knitter; Join Knitty; Meet a Mensch

Odin sweater, designed by Josh Bennett. Image © Josh Bennett.

We all know Josh Bennett, right? He’s the designer of some gorgeous knitwear. So it’s no surprise, but surely a delight, to hear that he’s designing sweaters inspired by the upcoming movie Thor: Ragnarok. In fact, Josh has a contract with Marvel that lasts through 2018, and is also working on designs inspired by Black Panther, due out next February.

What I love? Is that he’s getting fairly paid for the amount of work that goes into knitting a sweater. (And these are particularly gorgeous sweaters. Prices start at just over $1000. And there are only 10 pieces of each design available. Preorders start October 10.

Could we see Chris Hemsworth wearing one? Please?


Did you know Knitty has a mailing list for its readers, and one for potential designer/contributors? We do! And until last week, it seems they was broken. For a long while. Sorry about that. I fixed ’em, tho!

So if you would like to be kept up to date as soon as a new issue is released, or a new call for submissions is sent out, you can sign up here.

Speaking of contributor lists, I’ll be sending out the Spring+Summer Call for Submissions later tonight. Sign up now and make sure you don’t miss your chance to get your work featured in Knitty!


Mensch (good person) alert: Meet Gilles Chiasson, former homeless person who now knits for other homeless people to show that someone cares about them.

He invites you to join him if you’re near Notre-Dame-de-Grâce in Montreal. Information on how to connect with the group is at the end of the article.

 

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WWW: The gritty life of a Basque sheepherder; doughnut projectiles; crafting veterans; live in a knitting mill

Time to knit the doughnuts. (Photo courtesy The Northern Echo)

I stumbled across The Kitchen Sisters podcast last week, and this story’s title grabbed me. It’s about Basque sheepherders in the American west and it’s not the charming story you imagine it might be.


Holy crap, I miss the UK, especially when I read stories like this one, about a theatre needing knitted doughnuts for the audience to throw at the performers on stage. Not sure what doughnuts have to do with The Wizard of Oz, but I don’t care, either. Long live Panto! –>


A touching story about a Vietnam veteran and his Vietnam veteran husband’s passion for needlework (crochet, though the article mentions knitting).


Can’t own a knitting mill? Well, you could live in one if you’re partial to Syracuse. Rents range from $1,250 to $2,250 a month, and the apartments look pretty fabulous. Expect the standard exposed brick, 100+ year old beams, and 9-foot-tall windows.

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WWW: the *real* sea silk; when a yarn shop closes…; American superwash wool

Chiara Vigo, spinner of sea silk (byssus). Photo by Eliot Stein

Thanks to the BBC, meet the last surviving sea silk seamstress. Yes, yarn from a sea creature. What she does is painstaking to a degree few could imagine. And so beautiful.


It’s a great loss when we lose another yarn shop. Amelia Hodson has put it in words here. (No, it’s not about grabbing yarn for cheap.)


Did you know that “the American wool industry has been revitalized because of the superwash process”? Krista McCurdy sings the praises of American superwash wool. Read on.

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WWW: moths ain’t so bad; the gritty glory of British Wool; knittit on Reddit

Moths, by Emmet Gowins.

This week, WWW is all about visuals. And words. Visuals and words. Yeah, that’s it.


First off, moths. Knitters hate ’em, but dang, they’re beautiful. Take a look


Some really striking images and short videos from the British Wool industry by Jonas Bendiksen. Doesn’t work well on mobile devices.


Did you know there’s knitting discourse on Reddit? You’ll find it in knittit. Of course that’s what they call it.

There’s a nice vibe going on there…looks like a friendly spot.

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WWW: Transitions, silk production, great FOs, woolly spires, sock dreams, Womb in the news

Big news from some yarn stars this week of a transition happening with indie dyers Lorna’s Laces and Mrs. Crosby yarns. Congrats to Amanda and our very best wishes to Beth – we can’t wait to see what she has up her sleeves next!


This is my favorite kind of retro video: a Pathe newsreel about the production of silk from the time when England was a big mucky muck in the silk industry (1960ish). Flash required. 


Don’t you love when fiber peoples craft something that is herculean and then blog about it? Or is that just me? Well, Patricia made this amazing dress and you can read about it here. Red Heart never looked so good.


Going to the chapel and we’re gonna get kni-i-itting, going to the chapel and we’re gonna get kni-i-I-ting. (Musical doggerel aside – those are incredible works! )


Dream job alert! Got $10,000 and a thing for socks? ::swoon::


First published in Knitty in 2004, MK Carroll’s Womb was a cute & cuddly expression of MK’s interest in human anatomy. Interesting to see Womb appear in an article on the not at all cute & cuddly fight for reproductive rights in Canada – no matter what your stance on the issue, it’s good to see craft and activism meet.

 

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Things be changin around here (GOOD NEWS, do not panic)

Darling Readers,

Amy here, writing about a big freaking change to my life that I’m excited about and nervous and also yeah. It’s big. Biggy bigness.

I’m going back to work for someone else, in an office. An actual day job. I’ve accepted a contract position so that I can avoid living in a box around retirement age, which is not as far away as it was when I started Knitty 15 years ago. Taking this job will allow me to build a nest egg for my future by working for someone else (this place offers great benefits and treats contract workers very well). It’s something I’ve been thinking about doing for almost 2 years, and after applying and interviewing, someone chose me and I start next month.

The most important question you all have is this: how does this affect Knitty?

Knitty goes on as before, mostly unchanged as far as Readers are concerned. I have someone in place to code the patterns and features, though I will touch and massage every page before we go live. I’ll also continue to do all the images. Knitty will look like Knitty. If I hadn’t told you, I’m pretty sure you wouldn’t have noticed anything was different. However, hiccups happen. I hope you will be gentle on our team if they do…we’re gonna try very hard to avoid the hiccups.

Jillian‘s role is changing, too. Because she has a super-exciting new position (she’ll tell you more about that later), she will be stepping away from her role as Advertising Manager, as soon as the Deep Fall issue is published (September). Jillian has done a stellar job for so many years, but as advertising has declined, she has been earning less and less for the same amount of work. (Knitty has been subsidizing her salary in order to compensate her for this drop off, because it’s beyond her control and she deserves to be paid.)

(the best long-term easter egg in television history, imo.)

Thankfully for us all, Jillian will continue as Editor of Knittyspin, goddess of Reviews, and general inspiration and idea generator (Catalyst) for Knitty as a whole. She’s also the Managing Editor (she manages the Editor) and that aspect of her job will become more essential as I go back into an office where I’m not the boss. Those of you who deal with Knitty by email may get responses from either Jillian or me. I’ll still be here, but during weekday office hours, my brain belongs to my new employer. They’re paying for the privilege. It’s all good, man.

Advertising at Knitty has declined to a level that requires us to rethink its place on our pages. You’ll notice a change (the most minimally disruptive change, we hope) by the time the Winter issue comes out, and I’ll talk more about that in a future blog post. Once again, I want to thank our Patrons for supporting us and allowing Knitty to continue. We would not be here without them!

Kate continues in her role as Managing Technical Editor, and Ashley and Rachel are the rest of our Tech Editing team. They’re doing a great job, and we are thrilled to have them as part of our team.

Chris, our beloved Systems Administrator, is on Family Leave for the foreseeable future.


So this is all big stuff. But I need to do this. I’ve been working at home for 11 years. ELEVEN. It gets lonely here. I’m restless. Tully isn’t much help when it comes to water-cooler chat or bouncing ideas back and forth. I also think a new challenge, new environment, new people will inspire and energize me, and I could use some of that. The place I’m going to work (I’ll share here when I’m able) is a good one, the commute is minimal (easy streetcar ride) and the hours can be flexible. I’m not sure I could have found a better situation anywhere. I’m lucky. (No, it’s not Starbucks.)

I was worried about telling you all this because what would you think? Except Knitty Readers are the best, and I’m pretty sure they don’t want me living in a box either. I like to be transparent about Knitty stuff when I can, and so now you know. I’ll keep you updated as things shift about a bit behind the scenes, but mostly, you can count on Knitty continuing for many years to come, looking pretty much like the Knitty you know today (or better).

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