Author: Amy Singer

Things be changin around here (GOOD NEWS, do not panic)

Darling Readers, Amy here, writing about a big freaking change to my life that I’m excited about and nervous and also yeah. It’s big. Biggy bigness. I’m going back to work for someone else, in an office. An actual day job. I’ve accepted a contract position so that I can avoid living in a box around retirement age, which is not as far away as it was when I started Knitty 15 years ago. Taking this job will allow me to build a nest egg for my future by working for someone else (this place offers great benefits and treats contract workers very well). It’s something I’ve been thinking ...

WWW: Knitting and activism goes way back; FiberCrafty; creating an ocean liner by hand; Yarnit on Funderdome this Sunday

Seems to be the theme of the year in mainstream news’ craft reporting: A brief history of knitting and activism. Not just a story about Pussy Hats (but we do love a good Pussy Hat), this one dives deep, back to 1853. This might be of interest to those of you who make more than you can use: FiberCrafty looks to be a hand-crafted-fibery Etsy type thingy. So far, I see lots of roving and fiber, some notions, project bags and finished items like hats. Neat! Though this is done with plastic-canvas needlepoint, not knitting as the story suggests, it is an incredible achievement: 5-foot-long ocean liner created by a ...

WWW: A salute to Bob; writing instructions for using charts; KnitPetite wants your feedback; celebrating the fiber arts in NFLD

Bob, the most famous Boston Terrier in our knitting world, has crossed over the Rainbow Bridge. May your doggy afterlife be full of balls and kisses and treats, sweet Bob. Rest well. Our own Kate Atherley has written a very helpful post on writing instructions for using charts over at the Stitchmastery blog. The KnitPetite Project launched 6 months ago, and now they’d like your input in their survey. We love that this underserved area of the handknitting world is getting some attention! After the Great Fire of 1892 in St. John’s, Newfoundland, the School of Industry was established to help teach women ...

BONUS long-weekend post: TNNA 2017 @ Columbus

What’s it like to attend a fiber-industry trade show? When you’ve worked in the industry for (gulp) 15 years (!), you know so many people and, hopefully, you like them. If they like you, too, then it’s like a big working party. Tons of hugging and smiling and catching up on the news. And the work part? We get to see all the new products from yarn manufacturers and indie dyers, designers and makers of all types. It’s a pretty great industry to work in. Jillian comes with me whenever she can, but as her and her daughter’s joint birthday weekend coincides with TNNA almost every year, ...

WWW: interview with Maggie Menzel; how flax becomes linen, with bonus Irish accent; knitting, animated; cool sheepy design prototypes

We recently published a beautiful-bright cabled sock called Vinculum. On the Apocalypse Knitting blog, read an interview with Vinculum’s designer, Maggie Menzel. Those who know me know I am allergic to wool, and as a result, exceptionally fond of anything not-wool that’s worth knitting. Linen is at the top of my list. Thanks to the Mason-Dixon’s weekend newsletter, Snippets, I learned about the wonderfulness that is Colm Clarke of County Donegal (note his correct pronunciation: don-E-gal), who takes us, start to finish, through the process of growing flax and turning it into linen. Now you know why ...

WWW: TNNA, Knitting National Parks, a knit-loving Costume Designer; TCM Knitting Club is aces

Last week’s WWW update was lost in the pre-TNNA/Amy on vacation shuffle. Sorry about that. Kate did a much better job at making sure we never missed a week. I will endeavour to live up to her legacy in future. But on the positive side, TNNA (our industry’s trade show) was a fountain overflowing with great new products, inspiration, and quite a few connections made for new designs in future issues. Watch out for brand-new reviews when we launch the Surprise next month…we’re doing two sets of reviews every issue now, so you can see all the new stuff as soon as possible! And I’ll be writing ...

WWW on the fly:

The woman behind the Pussyhat and a team of awesome people have begun another wonderful initiative: the Welcome Blanket project. –> In Toronto, the arrival of warm weather means it’s almost time for the TTC Knitalong! I hope you’ll forgive the shortness of this post. Besides putting out the new First Fall issue (Patrons have access right now; the rest of the world gets access tomorrow morning at 10am), I’m prepping for TNNA which happens this weekend in Columbus, OH. OH the Jeni’s that will be consumed! Also this weekend, Squam. Oh, those lucky ducks who get to go! Maybe one year, it ...

WWW: Foot binding connected to textile production; Little Knittery forced to move; new New York craft festival; Danish elite buried in woollies

No, really. This fascinating article discusses research into the practise of foot binding in China as a means to keep girls in one place so they could contribute to the family’s income, making textiles. Wow. The Little Knittery, the shop that friend-of-Knitty Kat Coyle owns – which also happens to be the home of the legendary Pussyhat (which Kat designed!) – is being forced to move locations. But they’re not closing, so that’s good news, at least! –> Big craft festival coming up in NYC, June 3-4, 2017! The Craft in Focus Festival originated in Amsterdam, and this is its first year in New ...

WWW: The TCM Knitting club does Gable; missing Roger and his sweaters; an ode to our Kate

O the things I learn, writing the WWW blog post! Seems there’s an unofficial TCM knitting club which celebrates knitting + classic movies, and this month, their chosen patterns are inspired by “Gable’s casual yet snappy style.” They’ve picked out”a few patterns to suit a sharp-dressed man with outdoorsy tendencies.” Sounds yummy. Read lots more here — I’m signing up for this newsletter. It’s full of good juicy stuff! We lost Sir Roger Moore this week (he was my first Bond). Did you know he was also a sweater model back in the day?  —> I got to speak ...

WWW: Productive daydreaming; sewer pipe turned knitting machine; Pens’ Knitting Lady quoted; the circle of life as it applies to yarn shops

This is something I’ve always felt: Your brain can only take so much focus. (This is why I’m a happy acres-of-stockinette knitter.) Interesting reading! After building a knitting machine with tubing meant for sewers (the waste-transporting type, not tiny pointy needles and thread type), this lovely man has gone on to knit up thousands of pairs of socks for people in shelters in Saskatoon. You have to see what he came up with, the clever man. We’ve all heard about the Pittsburgh Penguins’ Knitting Lady, right? Here’s some rather intelligent commentary on knitting as a behavior ...