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Deep Fall Surprise: The Tuplet Shawl

Our SURPRISE for this most recent issue had two VERY different patterns. Very. The Anyadell thigh-high cabled socks are a once-in-a-lifetime jaw-dropping statement-making eye-popping sort of design. The Boss of Sock Knitting, as someone dubbed them. They’re amazing, no doubt.

But I have to say I am enormously fond of other pattern, the Tuplet Shawl, too. It’s gentle. It’s understated. It’s subtle. And it absolutely shouldn’t be missed.

Tuplet is an excellent way to use a gradient set, or use up partial skeins of yarn. Rather than resort to leftovers-socks (don’t get me wrong, I love leftovers socks) why not show them off in this shawl?

Imagine the color combos… let your stash fly!

The designer, Heather, has provided some background and supporting info – including a “cheat sheet” to help you keep track of the rows as you work.

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WWW: Academic Study, A Lifelong Habit, Epic Yarnbomb

With thanks to Donna Druchunas, who brought this to my attention.

Ruth Gilbert, textile historian and weaver, has kindly offered access to her 2009 MPhil thesis, “The King’s Vest and the Seaman’s Gansey: Continuity and Diversity of Construction in Hand Knitted Body Garments in North Western Europe Since 1550″. Fascinating reading.


And another academic study: a paper from University of Central Arkansas Theology department, looking at the work of the groups known as “Prayer-Shawl Ministries”. Quoting from the abstract: Prayer shawl ministries, overwhelmingly led and staffed by women, aim to give comfort to the bereaved. Shawl makers often want to respond to communal tragedy and grief such as mass shootings. This case study uses qualitative interviews with shawl makers from white and African-American ministry groups, placing their statements in the context of benevolent handwork, disaster response, and the culture of mass shootings.


Harriet Aufses, like many of us, knits scarves to donate to a good cause. She makes about 20 or so scarves a year, to be sent off to members of the US military serving overseas. What’s more remarkable about Harriet is that she is 90, and has been knitting for 85 years.


Whatcha doin’ in April? Come and hang out with me, Amy Herzog, Laura Nelkin, Catherine Lowe and Kim McBrien-Evans of Indigodragonfly in sunny California.


I write this on Tuesday morning, before we know the results of the US Election. No matter what the results, I couldn’t not share this fantastic work of yarn-bombing, by the very talented Olek:

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WWW: Poppies, Podcasting and Colors

With a hat tip to Bristol Ivy, I bring your attention to this magnificent way to spend the rest of the day: an analysis of 59 different color categorization systems from art and science, used over the past several centuries. Did you know that Isaac Newton published a colour theory?


Healthy cashmere goats. Images from The Times.

Important and illuminating reading: on Ethical fiber choices, written by Linda of Kettle Yarn Company. The article comes from research she did when sourcing her yarns and fibers.


Much discussion around Toronto last week prompted by this article in our local paper about a luxury hand-knit tuque being sold by a local fashion designer for $200. (And yes, there was also discussion outside of Toronto about the word ‘tuque’ – it’s Canadian for “beanie hat”.) The hat is made of a blend of merino, cashmere and qiviut. Honestly, the price sounds entirely reasonable to me, for that fiber blend and to compensate the knitter for the work that goes into it.


Jo of Shinybees

On The Guardian, a piece about how entrepreneurs use podcasting to help their businesses. Knitter Jo Milmine talks about how she uses her Shinybees podcast to connect with knitters all around the world, and how it opened up new business opportunities for her. Her work has been recognized as Best UK podcast at the New Media Europe Awards.


Image from Laura Chau’s website.

November 11th is Remembrance Day in various countries around the world – Canada, the UK, Australia and others. To commemorate the day, many choose to wear a poppy symbol. You might wish to make your own… patterns here. Traditionally, you buy a poppy from a seller, as a way of making a donation to groups who support veterans of war. If you do make your own, consider making a donation anyway. I made my own a few years ago, using Laura Chau’s pattern.

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WWW: Amy’s Fave Yarn Shops, Yarnporium, Planned Pooling

Our own Amy was interviewed for this great piece on the USA Today website about her favourite yarn stores around North America.


If you’re in the UK, mark your calendars for the weekend of November 5 & 6 – that’s the first ever Yarn in the City Yarnporium. More than 40 vendors and instructors are gathering for a weekend of shopping and workshops, at King’s College on the Strand.


This is jaw-droppingly clever: Planned Pooling. It’s an app to simulate knitting with variegated yarns, so you can see how they pool. Yes, really!


From the New York Times: What Knitting Can Teach Us About Parenting (and life in general, I think).


Image from Etsy.

Lovely profile of yarn dyer Jill Draper, on Etsy’s “Quit Your Day Job” blog.

 

 

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WWW: Winner of movie tickets; The Great Swatch Experiment

The two winners of our giveaway for tickets to see YARN THE MOVIE when it screens in Toronto are Marina and Claudia! We hope you enjoy it!


And I’m posting one article here this week because of how important I think it is. This week, instead of reading me, you should go read this blog post:

Kelbourne Woolens is running The Great Swatch Experiment, and they’ve posted the data from the first swatch.

If you’ve never really understood (or believed) that different knitters can get different results with the same yarn and the same needles – well, prepare to be blown away.

Image from The Kelbourne Woolens blog.

This post provides background on the series and the experiment. This is such an important thing to do!

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WWW: Rhinebeck Week!

Remember, if you’re near Toronto, enter to win a double-pass to see YARN THE MOVIE!


This week it’s THE WEEK. It’s the week of Rhinebeck, properly known as the New York State Sheep and Wool Festival, held in Rhinebeck, NY.

If you’re wondering what the deal is:

On the newly relaunched Mason Dixon Knitting website, a primer on How To Rhinebeck.

And yes, part of the fun is in knitting yourself a sweater to wear there. Because of a change in my schedule, I was able to plan a last-minute day trip via NYC. With less than two weeks to go, I decided that a bulky lopapeysa was going to be about all I could manage. I’ve been chronicling my progress on my instagram, and I was very happy to finish it up on Monday night. (Well, it still needs buttons but my excuse is that I’ll be shopping for them at the event.)

Amy, Jillian and I will all be there, and we hope to see you!


People Knitting: A Century of Photographs‘. There’s a magnificent preview here. Note: one of the images is ever so slightly NSFW, in the most amusing way possible.


From Fiona Goble, the designer behind Knit Your Own Royal Wedding, comes Knit Your Own Election: patterns to knit yourself woolly replicas of the two candidates in the US Federal Election.

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YARN the Movie comes to Toronto; Giveaway!

mv5bnjyyywiwm2ytmjg3oc00zdy1ltkwzjutzdi3yte5zjg3zwqxxkeyxkfqcgdeqxvymju1mdm3ndm-_v1_sy1000_cr006931000_al_I’ve written about YARN the Movie before, and I was very pleased to hear that it’s coming to Toronto. It’s playing at the Carlton Cinema October 21st-27th. AND we have two double-passes to give away!

The movie aims to introduce to the broader world the artists who are redefining the tradition of knit and crochet.

Reinventing our relationship with this colorful tradition, YARN weaves together wool graffiti artists, circus performers, and structural designers into a visually-striking look at the women who are making a creative stance while building one of modern art’s hottest trends.

Featuring interviews with fiber artists artists Olek, Tinna Thorudottir Thorvalder, Toshiko Horiuchi Macadam, Tilde Björfors of Cirkus Cikör and Barbara Kingsolver, the film is a visual delight, and an excellent look at our woolly world.

Watch the trailer here.

If you’re not in Toronto, it’s playing all over, in North America and Europe. Consult your local listings.


To enter, leave a comment below by midnight Sunday eastern time. We’ll announce the winner next week. The usual rules apply: if you’ve won something from us in the past year, please give others a chance. You’ll be asked to answer a skill-testing question. And remember, this is for Toronto screenings only, so you need to be able to get yourself to Yonge and College.

Save

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WWW: When yarn and science collide; our very own “Knitting Humourist”

Love love love these: knitterly illustrations from this week’s New Yorker.


Image (c) Pat Ashforth.

Even if you are not mathematically inclined, these projects are absolutely beautiful. And if you ARE, they are also jaw-droppingly clever. Mathematicians Pat Ashforth and Steve Plummer create yarny designs to illustrate mathematical concepts.

The blanket pattern on the left is derived from an image of a grid of superimposed sudokus puzzles, where each of the digits represents a different colour Sudoku grid…


Serves him right: a burglar broke into the home of a woman and managed to get away with only a briefcase full of knitting patterns. Although, if it was out-of-print and hard to find issues of the Rowan magazine, it wouldn’t be quite so funny…


Image (c) Allison Meier for Hyperallergic.

I had no idea: how the Pantone color system evolved from a way of categorizing bird colors.


A lovely profile of “Knitting Humourist” and friend-of-the-show Stephanie Pearl-McPhee, the Yarn Harlot, and her appearance at last weekend’s KnityCity event in Vancouver.

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Deep Fall WIPs and FOs

We’ve been project-peeping on Ravelry again!

Sellakka‘s Wings for Nightbird shawl is simply beautiful.

 

EternalKnitter’s Uberib slippers are fab! And such a quick knit, clearly!

 

KnitbritchesViatori vest is looking great… an excellent color choice.

Dublin16’s Rain Rain Go Away hat, made for a baby in rainy Seattle, is just perfect.

Artohline‘s Crystalline scarf looks very promising indeed.

And we love it when Knitty designers knit other patterns from the issue… Julia Farwell Clay, the designer of Viatori, is making her own http://www.knitty.com/ISSUEdf16/PATTlaurel/PATTlaurel.php.


And although not strictly worked to the pattern, we love Loopysue‘s version of my In Gord We Trust scarf.

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WWW: Terrible knitting pun of the week; on knitting with dog hair; illustrators attempt to depict knitting

Thinking ahead: our own Kate (yes, that’s me!) is teaching next October 20-22nd (yes, 2017) at beautiful St. Andrew by the Sea, New Brunswick, Canada.  Knit East features a great list of instructors and classes, in a fabulous setting.


Famous Illustrators’ Depictions of Knitting, Ranked in Order of Competence.


Comedian and writer John Hodgman, in his ‘Judge John Hodgman’ Advice column for the New York Times weighs in on a debate about knitting with dog hair.


I was recently reminded of this lovely work: the award-winning short film The Last Knit, directed by animator Laura Neuvonen. Take a few minutes and enjoy it.


How Knitting Has Taken Over the Highlands – a piece about the upcoming Loch Ness Knitting Festival, and the value of handscraft to the economy in the Scottish Highlands.


And related to the same event, this week’s nominee for best-worst knitting pun: a Car-digan. (Geddit?)


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