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WWW: Contest Winner, Fundraising & Men

Our lucky July contest winner is comment #642, Sara! (srgonzalez@…) Congratulations, Sara! We’ll be writing you to get your mailing info so you can get your hands on your new Kolláge square circular needles!


peep! peep!

A cancer patient in Wales has raised nearly £1 million ($1.5 million USD) for a cancer treatment center research by knitting and selling little Easter chicks. Over 600 knitters have supported the cause with their needles, and thousands have shown their support by buying a chick.  The chicks are popular with schoolchildren, allowing people of all ages to contribute to the cause.


Interesting discussion on the BrianKnits blog about whether knitting media is reinforcing gender stereotypes with the paucity of images of and designs for male knitters.  We know and love many male knitters, and have published a Man’s Issue, but Brian’s comments are worth reading and discussing.


Just one section of the hundreds of knitters at Toronto's Stitch & Pitch

Toronto’s Stitch & Pitch took place last night at the Rogers Centre [which will always be the SkyDome to us].

The Jays wiped home plate with the Orioles, winning with a brutal final score of 8-2. Sorry, Baltimore.

The Harlot threw out the first pitch, acquitting herself admirably, although we do think she might have felt more comfortable if it had been a ball of yarn.

This year’s event was a huge success, with universally popular door prizes [tons of them!] and great kit bags handed out to each of us as we presented our ticket. Great work, Stitch & Pitch Toronto team!

Stephanie gets escorted to the mound by the Blue Jays' mascot to throw out the first pitch

The Yarn Harlot on the Jumbotron!

Note the petite size of our Stephanie against the immense height of the catcher. Steph, you did us knitters proud.

Man, that's one tall baseball player.

Emily, Jacqueline, Jennifer and Jasmine enjoy the game.

Happy spouse with his knitter


Classic Elite Yarns has just launched their blog. Get a tour of their gorgeous headquarters, catch up on what the team is knitting, and learn more about what they have planned for fall.


A lovely article from the Oregon Live blog about knitting as a shared connection.

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WWW: Alice Starmore, Classes and Knit Chicken

Back in print this September!

Alice Starmore will be appearing at the upcoming IKnit Weekender in London, September 10 & 11th. This coincides with the republication of her books Aran Knitting and Fisherman’s Sweaters. Many of Ms. Starmore’s classic books, originally published in the 1980s and 1990s, are slated for republication, and they are must-haves in any knitter’s library.  Fair Isle Knitting appeared last year. Copies of the old editions can be hard to find, and sell for hundreds of dollars, so these republications mean that we can all have copies.


Also in the UK, in August, don’t forget our Amy’s classes at Knit Camp in Stirling, Scotland.


And while we’re talking of classes,  Stitches Midwest takes place in Chicago, August 19-22nd.  Expect the usual full slate of classes, shopping and general yarny fun for all.


A group of over 500 grandmothers in South Africa – many of them living in poverty – knitted more than 23,000 hats that were sold to tourists at the World Cup. Video news item from Brisbane Times in Australia.


Own a piece of your very own sheep farm! Read about yarn CSAs (Community Supported Agriculture share). Buying a share in a CSA helps support the farm and the flock, and you are repaid with a share of the shearing.


The Daily Mail tells us that crocheted fashions are making a comeback. We’re amused by the callout that says “Crocheted fabric uses a third more yarn than knitted fabric, but only one hooked needle is required to crochet – knitting requires two.” Because using two needles makes it so much harder? Silly mainstream journalists.


Image courtesy S. Caspar.

Firmly in the knitting as art category, Knit Meat from Etsy Seller Stephanie Caspar.


Add another name to the roll-call of glamorous knitters around the world…

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Obsession: Iced Coffee with A Shot of Vanilla

Slurp, slurp

It’s hot where I am – you may have already heard that.  I know it’s hot where a lot of our readers are.

When I was younger, my favouritest hot weather treat in the entire world was ice cream.  Now I’m a lactose-intolerant grown-up, my favouritest hot weather treat in the entire world is an iced black coffee with a shot of vanilla syrup.  It’s like a grown-up version of a coke float, in an odd sort of way — but with more caffeine!

Without giving any too many of our secrets, I can tell you with absolute authority that more than one iced coffee was consumed during the production of the First Fall issue of Knitty.

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WWW: Time; things to do while you’re knitting

German industrial designer Siren Elise Wilhelmsen has created the ‘365’ knitting clock.

The designer’s objective was to make time tangible and visible.  The clock features a 48-needle knitting machine.  Working clockwise, of course, each day it works a round, and over a year, creates a  2m-long scarf.

The clock was exhibited at the DMY International Design Festival in Berlin in June.


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Stitch & Pitch is coming soon to a city near you. Check out the site for dates and event details for each city.


Image courtesy Jumpers and Jazz Festival

The Jumpers & Jazz Festival kicks off July 15 in Queensland, Australia. The festival is a charming and eclectic mix of jazz and textile sculpture. There are contests for both yarn-bombing and sweaters. 150 trees are slated to be decorated, and there’s a wide range of musical gigs to enjoy over the two-week festival.


While we’re on the topic of yarnbombing, Knitta, Please has been spotted around NYC, working their yarny magic.

And more great yarnbombing here and here.

Image courtesy nyc the tumblr


Brilliant knitterly tool pointed out by a reader: printable rulers! Basic ones and more sophisticated ones. Print them out and laminate them or cover them in tape. They’re light, and they don’t take up too much room in your knitting bag.


A knitting group in Tacoma Washington, the Knotty Knitters for Autism, have posed for a 2011 calendar to raise funds for therapy, education and support for local children with Autism.

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New Yarns, A Few Events for Your Calendar, A Surprising New Spinner

The Knitty Spring+Summer contest winners have been chosen. The lucky winners’ names are on the Contest page. They’ve been contacted and are excitedly awaiting their prizes! Stay tuned…more contests will be announced for our upcoming First Fall issue, which goes live any day now.


We were excited to learn of the launch of Quince and Company, a new independent US yarn company founded by Pam Allen (ex-editor of Interweave Knits, designer and author), designer Carrie Bostick Hoge and their friend Bob Rice, who happens to own a spinning mill.  They have beautiful yarns, some lovely and very accessible patterns, and a wonderful sensibility: they have focused on sourcing products as locally and as environmentally and socially responsibly as they can.  Patterns and yarn are available from their website, and they are looking forward to distribution in local yarn stores in the near future.


A rainbow of yak gorgeosity. Image courtesy Lorna's Laces & Bijou Basin.

Last week, Lorna’s Laces announced a collaboration with Bijou Basin Ranch, to dye their delicious yak yarns in fabulous Lorna’s colors. The colors are “nearly solids” with a gentle, earthy edge.  Three different yarns will get the Lorna’s treatment.

Question: Why is it that the ugliest beasties make the most beautiful yarn? The yaks, that is, not the crew at Lorna’s!

Anyway, I personally adore the Bijou Basin yarns, and this is terrific news.


Image courtesy Knitter's review.

Registration for Clara Parkes’ 2010 Knitters’ Review Retreat opens today at noon EST.  Instructors include Ann Budd on the math of knitting, Clara herself on Yarn 101, Cat Bordhi on creating new stitch patterns, and Melissa Morgan-Oakes on knitting with beads.

It all takes place in Williamstown, MA, November 12-14.


The Bust Summer Craftacular London edition runs this weekend, July 10 at York Hall near the Bethnal Green Tube Station. Shopping, crafting, workshops and dancing from noon to 7pm! What more could you want for £2 admission?

And if you’re in London, don’t forget to put the iKnit London Weekender on your schedule, September 10th & 11th.


Prince Charles learns to spin, just in time for the Tour De Fleece.


Yarn bombing your own car? Brilliant!

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The Hidden Costs of Summer Knitting

The seasons have changed: it’s getting hot in the northern hemisphere, and cooler in the southern hemisphere.

Seasonal knitting is an interesting question: I know a lot of knitters who tend to put their needles down in hot weather.  Makes sense to me – do you really want to have a massive wool blanket draped over your lap when the mercury rises?

The colder the weather gets, I crave larger projects: blankets I can wrap around myself as I work, and big sweaters I can cuddle up with.

carefully knitting small things in the summer sunshine

I knit socks and lace in the summer, for the most part, and I choose the yarns carefully.  My hands get very warm and a bit clammy – I’m funny that way – and I’m always nervous that I might accidentally felt the yarn.

About 10 years ago, I offered to make a shawl for a friend’s wedding.  She was getting married in northern Ontario, in late September.  The evenings can get pretty cool there, so we chose a  mohair yarn.  All well and good, but a September wedding meant I was knitting in August – and it must have been the hottest August we’d had in some years.  It was a big shawl, too. At the time, I had a window air conditioning unit in my living room.  I spent every evening for four weeks huddled beside the window, with the air conditioning cranked up to maximum.

I finished it on time, and it was beautiful, and the bride loved it.

And a good thing, too: I can say with absolutely certainty that it was the most expensive thing I’ve ever knitted.  The yarn was pretty inexpensive – it was the air conditioning bill that pushed the price up.

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Gift Knitting Season Already?; Patriotism

Image courtesy Interweave Press.

Some knitters are starting to consider their project lists for end-of-year gift knitting.  To help you with those lists,  look for these books on your LYS bookshelf very soon:

Joelle Hoverson & Anna Williams’ More Last Minute Knitted Gifts

Mags Kandis’ Gifted: Lovely Little Things to Knit and Crochet

Anna Hrachovec’s Knitting Mochimochi: 20 Super-Cute Strange Designs for Knitted Amigurumi.  If you’re in the NYC area July 11th, attend the launch party at Brooklyn General Store to see some of this adorableness in person.

Betcha can't knit just one...


We’re in the throws of World Cup, and the season of National Holidays. No matter who or what you’re celebrating, make sure you have a knitted flag to wave:

The Stars & Stripes

The Maple Leaf Forever

Flag of St. George

If you’re looking for other patriotic accessories, try these:

Flag-themed hats from DROPS

Germany hat

Swiss Flag dishcloth/baby bib

A rather amazing collection of flag design coasters designed by Kathy Murray, available for purchase on Ravelry.

And if you’re more about the football than supporting a specific country, knit yourself an actual football.

Happy Canada Day to our Canadian friends &  Happy 4th of July to our US friends!

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Inspiration and Duck Feet

An arty and inspiring Wednesday.


Karen Searle, How My Mother Dressed Me (Detail); Image from KarenSearle.com

I’m regularly awed and inspired by the work featured on the ArtYarn blog….  the work of Fibre Artist Karen Searle was recently featured.

Karen works in a variety of fiber media, and she has knitted and crocheted a variety of pieces – some life size, and some miniatures.  The stunning dresses are each 6 inches high, knitted in copper wire.

ArtYarn is a collaborative knitting and crochet project coordinated by visual artist Rachael Elwell, and their goal is to collaborate with local community groups, world wide knitting and crochet networks and arts organizations to create gallery installations, public arts projects and creative craft workshops.

Both sites are worth a visit.


Blouse, mola, San Blas Islands, Panama, 20th century; Image courtesy of Textile Museum of Canada

The Textile Museum of Canada has just announce a new exhibit, Drawing with Scissors, featuring the Mola work of Kuna Yola. Running July 21, 2010 to February 13, 2011, the exhibit features the handcrafted traditional blouses of the Kuna people, an indigenous people of the San Blas Islands, Panama.

The motifs are worked in reverse applique and embroidery, and depict images from the world in which the Kuna live – invoking and blending both their traditional beliefs and way of life and the influence of the modern world around them.  Works might feature images of ancient spirits intertwined with images inspired by television – from the news or Disney cartoons.


Another stunning exhibition has just opened at the Newport Mills in Newport, New Hampshire.  Fabrications is a mixed media exhibition featuring work by 19 international, national and regional artists.  In acknowledgment of the building’s history as a working mill, Fabrications presents artworks using textiles in innovative, contemporary ways, and showcases projects that utilize weaving, sewing, knitting, crocheting, and spinning into unexpected forms and unusual materials.  It runs until September 25th.


Duck feet. Not just for babies anymore.

Looking for cuteness and high degrees of adorability in your knitting? Check out Petite Purls’ Summer issue. Full of great babies’ and kids’ patterns.

And if you need some cuteness in adult size, consider Jeny’s Felted Duck booties, a grownup version of the Duck socks from the Spring issue.


Did you win in our contest? Emails have gone out from knittyadmanager @ gmail to our lucky prize winners. Check your spam filters!


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What I’ve Knitty-ed

The Morgan hat. Not just for winter.

This past November I knitted myself a Morgan hat. It’s a tremendously fun and interesting knit, and I wore it all winter. I love it enough that I wore it on days when I didn’t really need a hat; I even wore it indoors.  And come summer, I’m still wearing it.

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Obsession: Coil-less Safety Pins

A good collection, improved

Many older knitting books mention a rather mysterious tool: the coil-less safety pin. I’ve been reading about them for years, and quietly wondering what the fuss is about. I’m always up for trying a new tool, but I could never seem to find them.

I do love me a good safety pin. I use them for all sorts of things: as markers, as stitch holders, as a crochet hook substitute for picking up dropped stitches, to keep track of a bunch of increases and decreases (just stick ’em in the knitting when you do the increase, and you can more easily count them). I even use big ones as shawl pins and instead of buttons on cardigans. I have a fair collection in a little tin – including the little plastic safety-pin style stitch holders.

The little plastic marker ones are good, but they are very small. And the traditional safety pin have a serious weakness: the yarn can get trapped in the coil. I’m doing a lot of lace knitting at the moment, and I’ve been nervous about using standard safety pins with delicate yarns. It occurred to me that coil-less safety pins might be the answer. But I’d never actually found any!

I’ve looked in every knitting shop I’ve ever been into, and never seen them.  Sure, stitch holders are basically giant coil-less safety pins, but they are too big. I wanted smaller ones.

Last weekend, a generous knitter (who also happens to quilt) was at one of my LYSs , waving around a bag full of coil-less safety pins. I cornered her and asked her where she got them. Turns out they are to be found in quilting shops. I’ve never stepped foot in a quilting shop in my life, so without her I may never have found them.

She gave me a few.

My life has changed.

I can use them for all the things I used to use normal safety pins for, but I need never worry about the yarn catching again.

I am indeed obsessed.  You know what to give me for my birthday…

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