Knitty Friday

Stalking Our Own Patterns

I do it all the time as a designer: I stalk my own patterns on Ravelry. I love seeing what yarns knitters have chosen; I adore seeing different versions and interpretations. And it makes me so happy to see my work being work, appreciated and loved all around the world.

And sometimes I have fun stalking Knitty patterns, too, for our Knitty Friday WIPs and FOs roundup. I love browsing through the projects for an issue to see what’s catching on, what knitters are enjoying making, and how a project is being received.

But something we’d never done until this week was browse all Knitty projects. Ravelry has this wonderful feature: you can see all the projects associated with our publication, from all issues.

As of Wednesday 3pm or so, there are 431,671 of them. It’s amazing and gratifying and wonderful.

Thank you!

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Surprise Pattern: Angular Velocity Socks

The clever and gentlemanly Rich Ensor has designed another winning sock: the Angular Velocity.

He writes about the inspiration and the design process on his blog.

Now, I’m not just bringing your attention to this blog post because Rich says nice things about me… (it’s a mutual admiration) but because Rich illuminates the design process.

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Surprise Pattern: Lady Lismore – KAL and prizes!

Our first Surprise pattern is the magnificently colorful, and colorfully magnificent Lady Lismore shawl. I love how utterly striking it is in this color combo. It’s a clever use of dropped and textural stitch patterns: entirely different from the usual lace shawl – both casual and more delicate at the same time.

The designer, Elanor King, showed us photos of her original version of it, ina totally different but equally fantastic color combo: blue and shocking pink.

She provides details on the colour choices and yarns for both versions on her blog.

In addition, Elanor is running a KAL, with prizes! It starts today, so hopefully you’ll have something in your stash to get started. Or go shopping tonight, after work.

 

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Geek Socks

I’m a sock knitter. You might know that.  And I have a particular weakness for self-striping sock yarns. It’s fun to move to the next color, sure… but after a while, you’ve got a drawer full of pretty similar socks… stripe, stripe, stripe, stripe.

How to make it a bit different? How to vary up the patterning without up the difficulty level (or indeed creating a million loose ends to be woven in)?

First-time Knitty designer Wei S. Leong has come up with a simple yet clever solution (my favorite kind) in this slipped stitch color pattern, The Geek Socks. A well-place pattern of slipped stitches makes wavy-wiggly stripes. So easy to knit, and yet so utterly wonderfully different.

She writes about them here. How good is this rainbow version?

Fantastic!

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Spring & Summer Issue WIPs & FOs

CanadianNeedlesMylui Lino top is coming along nicely. This just makes me crave warm summer sunshine.

Simple elegance. A great yarn substitution!

FiatKnitter‘s Mia tank is coming along well.

Fantastic colour choice.

KnitPearlKim‘s Nahant scarf.

A minor variation – narrower to make sure the knitter had enough yarn. But just as wonderful!

And I adore this version, in handspun.

Can’t wait to see it grow.

Love these rainbow-tastic Geek Socks by OnlyLouise.

So much fun!

And this close-up of the lace and beads gets me very excited about TNTknit‘s Hybrid Vigour project.

Beautiful yarn and bead combo. Subtle and sophisticated.

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On Hybrid Vigour & A Traditional Shawl Variation

Have you see the beautiful cover design in the latest issue? Mary-Anne Mace’s Hybrid Vigour. It’s a hybrid design, in that it’s a shawl that is partially closed, to be worn like the most elegant poncho ever.

A poncho, but not a Poncho, y’know?

I mean, I do like a poncho. They’re particularly great at this time of year – for transitional weather. But I wouldn’t use the word elegant to describe them. Mary-Anne has made a practical thing beautiful. And we love her for it.

Of course, you might want to just wear it as a shawl, too. Mary-Anne has kindly produced notes and instructions on how to work it flat, if you’re so inclined.

Just beautiful!

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Evangelina: Stitch-Maps Charts

Today’s post comes from guest writer, JC Briar, developer of the Stitch-Maps charting tool. She’s written for us before, and her clever tool permits interesting and illuminating analysis of complex stitch patterns and their behaviour.


Checking out the charts in the latest Knitty, I was struck by the charts for Evangelina.

Victorian
Evangelina’s Victorian Stitch Pattern is so clean and pretty. Did its charts have to be so disjointed? In particular, was it really necessary to slip stitches across the beginning-of-rounds marker at the end of round 6 and at the beginning of round 8?

To better understand the stitch pattern, I drew a stitch map for its instep version – that is, the version that features edge stitches, in the form of purls worked at the edges of Evangelina’s instep.

instep-v1

With the stitch pattern’s original red repeat boxes overlaid on top, we can see where the repeat shifts at the beginning of round 7. At that point, markers placed between repeats have to shift one stitch to the left, out of the way of the p2tog on round 7.

But is this the only way to define the pattern’s repeat? Viewing the stitch map again with column guides tracing the stitch columns, it’s possible to visualize a more convenient repeat for the pattern.

instep-v2

Markers placed between these repeats would run between stitch columns, and would never need to shift.

Going a step further and discarding the edge stitches, we come up with an alternate way to work the pattern on Evangelina’s leg.

leg

Voilà! The beginning-of-rounds marker can stay put.

Truthfully? The more I play with stitch maps, the more certain I become that almost all stitch patterns can be worked in the round without ever having to shift the beginning-of-rounds marker. It’s all a matter of paying attention to the stitch columns, and defining the pattern’s repeat in accord with those stitch columns.

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The Stars and Stares Pillow

Have you seen the Stars and Stares eye pillow in our latest issue? One of the reasons I like this pattern for some many reasons: it’s a different way to use knitting, it’s uself, and it provides a great project on which to practice your colourwork skills.

Clever and fun! Just the sort of thing we adore.

The first-time Knitty designer, Ruth Roland, has written a series of blog posts about the design and the process of being published in Knitty.

She writes about the filling options for the eye pillow…  the pros and cons of different materials to create the stuffing, and various options for scent.

She writes about variations of the design….

And the process of being published. I blushed and chuckled about being referred to as “heroic”…

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Evangelina Socks

Yay Spring and Summer issue! Yay for summery knitting!

And delicate lace socks are just the thing for summery knitting! We loved Ruth Churchman’s Evangelina sock pattern the minute we set eyes on it.

Beautiful!

And then to learn of its wonderful inspiration – even better.

Ruth works at National Museums of Scotland library, and she found this book in the library collection: Scrivenor, M. Elliot. Collection of Knitting and Crochet Receipts. John Paton, Son and Co., Alloa, 1896.

The design is based on a Victorian baby’s Bootee pattern Ruth found in its pages… More about it on her blog.

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Thinking of Summer

I know I can safely speak on behalf of the entire Knitty team in saying that we’re tired of winter. It’s been a cold and snowy one, and we’re all getting a bit grumpy.

To cheer myself up, I went cruising through our back issues to look for a spring-themed projects. It might be a while before I can wear them, but I can at least start the knitting…

Because I’m tired of my scarves at this point, I think a glamorous new shawl would be wonderful. Cold Mountain is big enough to wear now for warmth, and yet still lacy and light enough to wear on early summer days over a dress.

Make it in a really cheerful springy color!

And because even when the snow goes, there will still be cold winds… perhaps a new pair of fingerless mitts? These Queen City ones are chic and interesting to knit, but will go quickly.

A change is as good as rest. You might still need to wear mittens, but these are at least fresh and new!

There’s the Carnaby skirt, which I think would be a fantastic transitional piece… still warm, but with hints of springy flirtiness and fun.

Heavy tights now; lighter tights or even bare legs later!

In hopes that I might get to expose my arms again at some point, there’s the Petrie Shell

So chic.

And how could you not feel summery making a gorgeous Elenka dress for a little girl in your life?

So great!

And remember what Denny says: no knitting with grey or brown in February and March. Knit the colors that are missing from your life in this dull and muddy time of year: choose greens and reds and pinks and purples and oranges. Cheer yourself up!

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