What’s What Wednesdays

www: distinguishing blue; a new knitted suit; goats

There’s Evidence Humans Didn’t Actually See Blue Until Modern Times The Himba tribe struggled to see blue, but can distinguish many more shades of green than many. “This all suggests that, until they had a word from it, it’s likely that our ancestors didn’t actually see blue. Or, more accurately, they probably saw it as we do now, but they never really noticed it. And that’s pretty cool.” Knitting with a repurpose: Woman makes suit of plastic bags Rosa Ferrigno knit a suit from plastic grocery bags. Please enjoy these goats on a slide. (links to a video on Twitter)

WWW: knitting robots ; unconventional weaving; periodic table of the elements

Do robots dream of knitting? Knitting machines exist, but there’s something different about knitting with two sticks and string. At the University of Berlin (Germany), research by Dr. Pat Treusch is underway to determine how to teach a robot, PANDA, to knit. You can learn more about PANDA at Do robots dream of knitting? – Träumen Roboter vom Stricken?. Can you weave that? For artist Anne Samat the answer is often yes. She mixes traditional yarns with unconventional materials like rattan sticks or metal. [Photo Anne’s work Freedom 1 … To Be Me (rattan sticks, yarns, washers, rakes, PVC chains, home ...

WWW: ancient sewing needles; math & knitting; Philippine weaving

Sewing Needles Reveal the Roots of Fashion. Not only were they used to sew seams, but also to provide embellishment. (Photo: F. d’Errico/L. Doyon) [via JM] This article explores the research of Elisabetta Matsumoto. She looks into how different stitch types determine the stretch and shape of knitted items. Not only is it useful traditional knitting but also for material science. (Photo: “Topological defects in the square can shape the (a) out-of-plane and (b) in-plane deformations of knitted textiles.” Elisabetta Matsumoto) The Great Women Project Revives The Philippine Weaving Industry. The textile ...

WWW: Drought & Navajo Shepherds; Handicraft Prize Winners; Ukiyo-e Search

Irene Bennalley walks her herd of Navajo-Churro sheep out to grazing land where extreme drought has gripped the Four Corners region near Two Grey Hills, New Mexico. Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times
This article looks at the impact of drought on Navajo shepherds in the SouthWest. The Navajo Sheep Project set up a drought relief fund to help shepherds and their sheep sustain this latest challenge. via LG. Photo: Irene Bennalley walks her herd of Navajo-Churro sheep out to grazing land where extreme drought has gripped the Four Corners region near Two Grey Hills, New Mexico. Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times Three keen needleworkers, all in their 90s, have come away with first and highly commended prizes for their handicrafts at the Newcastle (Australia) show. Photo: Whiddon Redhead residents Linda Felton, ...

WWW: a jumper for a guinea pig; the history of orange; celebrating repair

tumeric powder
A knitting group is making jumpers for people’s unwell pets. Gingernut the guinea pig looks rather fetching in his green jumper don’t you think? The History of the Color Orange offers a brief look at this bold and dynamic color. Grace Bonney of Design Sponge posted a fascinating floor to instagram. It reminded her of Kintsugi is the Japanese art of repairing pottery with gold, silver, or platinum. That had me thinking of visible mending. I turned to the knitty archives and found this 2006 article from our Kate Atherley, on Repairing Knitwear. Also of potential interest to knittyblog readers is ...

WWW: Studying Stretch; Art in Puerto Rico; Beaded Knitting

What do earthquakes, robotics and jumpers have in common? Samuel Poincloux completed his PhD by studying how the stretch a knitted fabric is rooted in mechanics. The Topologies of Excess: A Survey of Contemporary Practices from Puerto Rico is on display at Cuesta College’s Harold J. Miossi Gallery (San Luis Obispo, CA) through Feb. 24. If you are into beaded knitting, this jumper from instagram user @laerkebagger is inspiring! I agree with our Editor, It’s almost like looking at a universe of stars and planets from very far away. Such a labor of love. Loading…

WWW: Life-size Crochet; Textile Art; Planning and Fast Fashion

Two takes on life size knit and crochet projects, first the inside — an anatomically correct skeleton by artist shanell papp. The second is by yarn artist Liisa Hietanen, of villagers in her Hämeenkyrö, Finland town. Her ability to capture the likeness is inspiring. At vogue.com, they explore the work of a few fascinating textile artists, including Vanessa Barragão. Her tapestries are oceanic and naturalistic-inspired works that reflect themes of climate change, the perils of conspicuous consumption, and a celebration of the natural world. Fashion’s trash problem is partly a planning problem. This ...

WWW: digitized archives for hats & chromatics; meet purl

Want to view an archive of vintage hats without going outside? Now you can because the Minnesota Historical Society has unveiled a vast digital archive. Stephanie Olson, a Minnesota Historical Society collections associate has digitized 717 women’s hats from their massive collections, making images of their brims and grand embellishments available to the public. Continuing in the digitized archive theme, “Chromatics” (1817) describes an early color system stressing harmony & analogy, including the relationship between color and music! (h/t Jillian!) Meet Purl… the star of a new pixar ...

WWW: a second life for public art projects; crochet prodigy; Tla’amin baskets + maths

Remember the twiddle-mitts sensory aid for dementia patients I posted a few weeks ago? A knitting group recycled yarn bomb projects into 187 cuffs! 11 year old Jonah loves to crochet. He learned at age 5. Jonah gives me hope for the future! The Callysto Salish Basket project at Simon Fraser University in Canada is a collaborative project that explores the functional mathematical beauty of the Tla’amin Nation baskets in a digital learning resource.

WWW: knitted games; weaving tradition to regain purpose; sustainability in fashion

Weavers at textile cooperative in northern Vietnam's Quan Ba district.
Last week we learned about an 8-bit gold embroidered computer and the yarn recorder. This week I invite you to knit monopoly. Or if you prefer mystery knits, this year’s MIT Mystery Hunt included a knitting clue. [thank you for the link A!] In this article, One stitch at a time: Weaving rehab for Vietnam trafficking victims, we visit a textile cooperative in northern Vietnam’s Quan Ba district. It provides hope, income, and purpose to women of the Vietnamese Hmong hill tribes many of whose lives have been blighted by people trafficking while also preserving the local tradition of weaving. A jeans factory ...