WWW: Memorials, Mochi and Mobsters

Congratulations to the winner of our Ninja-bonus giveaway contest [August 30]: Peggy H. wins a copy of the brand-new Sockupied mag!


The Scarf of Hope is a massive cooperative project in Peru to create a memorial to the over 15,000 men and boys lost in Peru’s bitter internal conflict between rebels and state forces in the 1980s and 1990s. Women who lost members of their family are being encouraged to contribute to the scarf – every square features names of the missing – which organizers expect will reach over a kilometer in length. Many of the victims remain officially missing, as they were never found.

The choice of a scarf is significant, not just because of the strong handwork traditions in Peru, but also  because in a part of the world where formal ID documents are rare, clothing was often used as means of identifying the victims. A sad story, but an uplifting project.


Delicious!

Crystal Palace Yarns has launched a newsletter, and their first issue talks all about their  long-variegation Mochi yarn line.  The newest addition to the Mochi family, Chunky, is just stunning.

Mini Mochi, the first yarn in the family, was used for the Coquille shawl, in the First Fall issue.


An interesting piece on the BBC News Magazine about how Girl Guides played an important role during WW2 supporting the troops and citizens of the UK. Knitting socks was a key contribution!


Beep-beep, yeah!

As a VW driver, I couldn’t not bring your attention to this… a truly wonderful vintage VW bug done up yarn-bomb style.

Upping the game somewhat, 20 Swiss grandmothers have knitted a cosy for a Smart Car, and have contacted Guinness about a possible record for the largest hand-knitted car cosy.  I love the idea that there is a record for this, but a Smart Car is pretty small…


And Sony is up to something yarny … Sony Japan has posted some sort of teaser page on their Playstation website, and it seems to depict a crocheting mobster. We are officially intrigued.  Visit soon, as the countdown is pretty close to finishing.

Stash Control and a New Shelf

I don’t know about you, but I love to have all of my spinning stash around me. Well, a lot of it anyway. I’m lucky enough to have a family that understands the need for piles of stash.

We have an inactive fireplace in our family room that I have claimed , using the hearth as my stash home. Not in any organized fashion, mind you. Though I organize it periodically, it never stays that way. It’s subject to whims, shopping trips and current deadline projects.

Um, where's the fireplace?

Because I know you’ll understand, here is an un-doctored, un-neatened photo of my fireplace stash.

You spinners who are in long term relationships know what’s coming, right? My husband wants the fireplace back, all of it.

I really don’t need all of that space and now we have a mischievous puppy, so my stash and tools should be more contained.

Are you kidding me?!

We surveyed the rooms and spaces on our main floor and came up with this for me.

Yep, that’s my stash space. It’s 6 feet tall and those shelves are only 12″ wide. Of course, I may take out all of the shelves and just stuff fiber from top to bottom, we’ll see.

I do have secondary stash storage (don’t pretend that you don’t) in the basement, so I have a place for the overflow to go. But some days, many days actually, it’s about surrounding yourself with your fuzzy love.

This also means I need to organize my basement stash (again) to be able to find anything.

What tips do the more organized, yet still big stashers, have for me?

And my basement stash, 20+ years of yarn, fiber and books?

I’m not showing — a girl needs her fiber secrets, after all.

Ninja-bonus giveaway post!

sockupied launches today

Out of the blue, we’ve got a surprise ninja giveaway! [We love giving you stuff.]

Today brings the launch of a new digital magazine, Sockupied, from the folks at Interweave.

It’s not an online mag, though you get it from the internet. It’s quite a different thing. And it’s full of socks! This first issue also features a profile of our very own Cookie A! Go Cookie!

Here’s how their press release describes it: “Sockupied is available as a digital download exclusively from Interweave’s online store for $14.97, beginning today. The eMag is actually a 365-megabyte application that users download and install to a Macintosh or PC computer; once installed, the application runs on the Adobe AIR platform.

Want to win a copy? Leave a comment to this post by midnight eastern time today [August 30, 2010]. We’ll pick one winner and announce the lucky person on our WWW post [that’d be this coming Wednesday].

Good luck, everyone!

Just who is writing this thing?

You may have noticed that the KnittyBlog has diversified. It used to be a one-woman blog with Amy mouthing off on whatever she felt like writing about that day. A while ago, Jillian wisely suggested that there are 4 of us who work on Knitty. Each of us has a different background, different likes and dislikes, and different life-based and geographical perspectives. Which is way more interesting than just one person being mouthy.

So we made it so. The KnittyBlog has been brought to you by the Knitty Team since early 2010, and we figure it’s time we officially introduced ourselves. We take turns writing this thing, and you can always tell who the author is by looking up there next to the date of the post.

Amy

Amy is the editor of Knitty. She’s also the publisher and founder of the magazine. In 2002, it came to her in a dream while sitting on the living room couch that she should start an online knitting magazine to feature the knitting talent she’d been seeing on blogs all over the world in one tidy, professional-looking website. The rest is happy history.

She loves ukuleles, rabbits [her babies are 2 mini-rex sisters named Squeeze and Boeing], scooters and shiny things. She’s allergic to wool and sensitive to all animal fibers, so she’s the non-wool knitter in the Knitty crew. She lives in Toronto and can often be found hanging out, having a latte and knitting, at The Purple Purl. She is frequently obsessed with technology and gadgets, and quite likes shoes that don’t hurt.


Jillian

Jillian is the editor of Knittyspin, Knitty’s Ad Manager and Catalyst of the whole shebang. This means she is often the brains behind the exciting new ideas we implement at Knitty, like this blog-writing thing and the recent issue shift to our two-fall publishing schedule. She’s also the reason there is a Knitty — her passion, brain and heart have helped Amy build the magazine and keep it on the grass-roots path we all feel is so important. If you ever meet her, thank her.

Jillian has been a knitter forever, and a spinner almost as long. Spinning is her current passion, and she spends part of almost every day at her wheel. Her hangout is The Spinning Loft in Howell, MI. She likes vintage dresses, Tim Burton, British murder mysteries and listening to her kids sing in the bathtub. She recently welcomed a rescue puppy — Atticus — into her home, and in addition to all the usual puppy training, she is watching him carefully to make sure he doesn’t start teething on her spinning wheels.


Mandy

Mandy is the senior technical editor of Knitty magazine. Mandy has a terrifyingly skilled knitting-focused brain, and prides herself on making Knitty patterns, especially the complex ones, as knittable as possible. She’s also a talented designer, having been published in several magazines [including Knitty, of course].

Mandy paints, makes unique jewelry and is a star at wardrobe remixing — turning humble thrift-shop clothing into super-desirable fashion. She’s also the co-author of the super-cool book Yarn Bombing. Her Vancouver-based hangout is Three Bags Full, and she shares her home with Roxy, the rescue kitty.


Kate

Kate edits Knitty’s sock patterns and all of the patterns in Knittyspin, and has recently taken on the job of keeping us organized as our Editorial Assistant.  She is a mathematician, which comes in handy in all aspects of her knitting work. Kate is a highly regarded knitting teacher in Toronto, and offers her professional services through several Toronto-based shops and beyond.

She is an expert on all things deli, and is a regular at Caplansky’s. She likes double-pointed needles, kitten heels and strong coffee. A puppy recently showed up on Kate’s doorstep, literally: a little abandoned boy with [perhaps] beagle and shepherd in him, Dexter is now officially part of her family.

Obsession: Cooler Weather

Image courtesy McKinney Texas Daily Photo Blog

It’s been a long, hot summer where I live. It started early, and it has been relentlessly hot and sunny since May.

Now, I do like summer very much. I love light cotton skirts, and ice cream, and feeling the warmth of the sun on my face. I love iced coffee, and the beach, and being able to take the dog out for a walk without four layers of protective clothing.

But if truth be told, summer is not my favorite season.

I’m a Fall girl; an Autumn girl. I love cool, sunny days; I love listening to the leaves crunch under my feet as I walk. I love dark rainy nights.

Why? Because I’m a knitter, of course! Cool sunny days are ideal for wearing woollies; dark rainy nights are ideal for staying at home and knitting.

And I love that first snow – because it gives me an opportunity to wear my favorite hat.

I’m a cheap date.

i kees you, new beloved spindle.

I’m also a gear ho. So it wasn’t surprising that, when I recently visited the Chelsea, MI-area spinning guild — The Spinner’s Flock — that I’d be trolling the tables of fiber and goodies for sale to see if anything was there that I couldn’t live without.

There is a lot of wool. Beautiful 9-month-preganant-belly-sized balls of woolly roving, elegant braids of hand-dyed merino/tencel [from my friend, Carla, which is why I remember the URL], and lots of equipment. Obviously the wool stayed put.

On a second pass through the hall, the spindle shown above caught my eye. Ooh, pretty colors! But more interestingly, the top of the shaft doesn’t have a hook — it has an integrated pigtail. I thought it was neat. I gave it the spin-in-the-palm-of-my-hand test [which means nothing likely, but it seemed zippy], and since it was a whopping $14, I bought it.

I took my new prize back to the circle of friends I was spinning with, and attacked my silk roving, expecting nothing much. Within minutes, I realized this thing was a gem. A keeper. Possibly my favorite spindle. And by this time, the vendor had packed up and gone home. I hadn’t taken a business card. No, really — this IS now my favorite spindle. [I have going on 20 spindles, and they all cost more than this one. Oh, the irony!] Light, spins like a full-on dervish [double rainbow!], and the pigtail is sheer genius.

MUST. HAVE. ANOTHER.

Can anyone help me find my holy grail?

look how it makes the pretty with the tussah silk.

love the aqua. if my soul had a color, it would be aqua.

looks heavy, but it's actually very light.

WWW: Big gestures, big knits & big stars

For a good cause!

The Knitting Noras, a group in Bolton, England, has announced a follow up project to their successful 2010 Naked Knitters calendar: postcards.  The calendar project raised £5,600 for Christie’s Hospital Cancer treatment unit.

The postcards feature bonus pictures from the original photoshoot, and are being sold online, for £1 each, £4.50 for a set of 5 and £9 for a set of 10.  There’s equal opportunity sauciness – ladies and gentlemen, knitting and crochet.  Something for everyone!

Proceeds raised will go to After Adoption, a charity group in the UK that provides support and assistance for people affected by adoption.

The cards will also be available at the Manchester Stitch and Creative Craft Show  3 to 5 September and at the I Knit Weekender in London 10 & 11 September, and at events in the Bolton area throughout the autumn.


And on the other side of the pond, Knots of Love has announced that as of earlier this month they have donated over 58,000 knitted and crocheted caps to to chemo patients and others facing life-threatening illnesses and injuries.


Lovely.

Lantern Moon announces a new line of knitting needles, the world’s first wooden needles made from Forest Stewardship Council certified and sustainably harvested trees.  And they’re beautiful!

They will be available in September.


Jared Flood has posted stunning photo essay of his visit to the Shetland Islands. First part, second part.


Julia Roberts has a knitting and sewing room!


Not a new one, but still worth six minutes of your time: Artist Rachel John indulges in some of her trademark Extreme Knitting – this time, 1000 strands of yarn at once.


Getting gauge might be tricky...

On the topic of big knitting, the ultimate scarf and quick knit, shown in the fall 2010 collection of Maison Martin Margiela. Remarkable website design, too.

This is all part of a revival of Aran knits seen this season on the runways… more about it in this Irish Times article.

On a related note, there will be a talk on Wool Craft & Traditional Clothing on an Aran Island, August 28th at the Galway City Museum, Galway, Ireland, as part of the Galway Heritage Week.

Keeping Track with Tags

Another excuse to go to the office supply store.

Sometimes it’s the little things that save your sanity in knitting.

The humble hang tag has come to my rescue many times.

I’m a process knitter. Which is a nice way of saying I love to knit but it take me a while to finish projects. I might have a dozen or so projects and swatches for future projects going at once.

I’ve tried keeping track of it all with sticky notes, with notebooks, with computer programs, for me, none of that works because they are all separate from the knitted piece.

When I start a project or swatch I attach a hang tag after a few rows of knitting. I note the pattern name, yarn, needle size, etc on one side for a project that’s pattern based. I note the stitch pattern, book name and page number and needle sizes for a swatch project.

My knitting brain on a string.

On the reverse of the tag for either type of project I keep track of the row I’ve just finished when I stop knitting.  I add additional tags as I need them.

When I go back to a project after a month (or more) all of my information is there waiting for me.

Attention non-woolly sock knitters!

The day has arrived. Sock Candy, the non-woolly version of Blue Moon’s Socks That Rock, has returned in beautiful hand-painted glory! Says Tina, “We are offering our Sock Candy for a very limited time as a hand paint. It is not our intention to continue to hand paint this yarn. Instead we’re venturing into having it mill dyed in multicolors.”

One last chance to grab the most beautiful hand-painted cotton sock yarn ever!

Sock Candy, hand-painted by Tina. YUM.


[Yup, Singer was made for me. Literally. How flattering, and irresistible, is that? No worries, I placed my order before I posted this. Because I know what you knitters are like. Because I’m one of you. :)]

WWW: Squids & Bridges

Congrats to the winners of our most recent contest, chosen by Shannon Okey herself:

Big winner [prize: a copy of The Knitgrrl Guide to Professional Knitwear Design, plus the choice between one of her online classes OR an one-one consultation with the pro herself]
Allison
August 4, 2010 at 12:49 pm

Cracked Shannon up by mentioning zombie apocalypse winner [prize: a copy of The Knitgrrl Guide to Professional Knitwear Design, plus one online class]
Susan
August 4, 2010 at 4:55 pm

Mentioned tweets about this contest winner [prize: a copy of The Knitgrrl Guide to Professional Knitwear Design, plus one online class]
Rachel Erin
August 4, 2010 at 2:21 pm

Winners, watch your e-mail for a message from contest queen, Jillian!


You'd get more knitting done with all those tentacles...

Stitch London and the London Natural History Museum invite you to join them on August 27th to Stitch-a-Squid.  This event is part of their Deep Sea exhibition, celebrating all the weird and wonderful creatures that live in the depths of the oceans.

Six knitted specimens have already been found in and around the exhibitions…


Biggest yarn-bomb ever?

Sue Sturdy is leading an initiative in southwestern Ontario to complete the KNIT CamBRIDGE project.  The objective is to cover Cambridge’s Main Street Bridge entirely in knitting, as a collaborative large scale piece of outdoor public art, to raise the profile of knitting in a region of Ontario that used to be a home to many spinning mills.  Over 1000 knitters have already contributed to the project, and about half the bridge cosy is complete.  It will be installed starting September 9th for it unveiling on September 11th.  The piece will remain in place until September 26th, when it will be taken apart, washed and remade into blankets and scarves. Many pieces will be distributed to social services agencies, including shelters for the homeless, and other pieces will be auctioned off with proceeds also being distributed to charity and the Cambridge Arts agency, which is supporting the project.

Knitters from the Cambridge area and all over the world have already participated, and knitters are encouraged to get involved in these last few weeks.  Even a small 8 inch wide strip will help! More info here and details on how to contribute here.

Visitors to the Kitchener-Waterloo Knitter’s Fair that weekend should take a detour to see it.


If you love lace...

Interweave Knits has announced a new edition of the beloved Knitted Lace of Estonia, by Nancy Bush, to be published in September. This edition includes a bonus 1 hour DVD with videos and bonus material on the traditions, the patterns and the various techniques used in the book’s designs, as well as instructions on designing your own Estonian style lace shawl. Nupps lessons straight from the master herself!


Rest a while and knit.

Popular yarn shop Loops is opening a second location in Tulsa, OK. The shop was designed in collaboration with Interior Design students from Oklahoma State University, and is a bright, open and welcoming space for crafters and their families. A “man cave” provides a corner for ‘muggles‘ to read magazines, play hand-held video games, and rest while their crafting companions shop, and a playroom keeps the kids busy.  There’s a classroom, and a “yarn bar” where visitors can hang out, surf the web for patterns and idea, or even just knit or crochet.

A Grand Opening celebration takes place the weekend of August 27-29, featuring workshops, giveaways, and live alpacas in the parking lot.


Shannon Okey’s Cooperative Press announces two new books coming this fall: Hunter Hammersen’s Silk Road Socks, and “literary knitting romp” What Would Madame Defarge Knit?, edited by Heather Ordover of the popular knitting and books podcast CraftLit.


Milwaukee’s Stitch & Pitch Night gets some love from ESPN.


Sheep take over a Hobbit village in New Zealand.